Troy Foundry Theatre to Participate in Elizabeth Murray Artist Residency by Collar Works

Troy, NY –  Troy Foundry Theatre has been selected to participate in the prestigious Elizabeth Murray Artist Residency by Collar Works in August of 2019.  Troy Foundry Theatre, along with producing and creation partner Die-Cast of Philadelphia, will be the first theatre companies in the country participating in the Murray residency, which up to this point has focused on supporting visual artists.  The companies will take residence for a week to train and co-create a new devised piece of work, which will premiere in Troy, NY and then travel to Philadelphia in the Fall of 2019. The Elizabeth Murray Artist Residency program by Collar Works is designed to provide emerging and established artists an immersive, supportive, productive and communal atmosphere for art making and dialogue on a bucolic 77-acre farm in Washington County.  The residency program aims to create opportunities for artists to take risks and develop new contemporary works across many art forms, primarily visual and literary arts, while engaging in meaningful dialogue with fellow residents and arts professionals. The goal is to create a residency program that responds to the critical needs of emerging artists.

 

“Troy Foundry Theatre is a perfect fit for this residency.  Over the last two years we have developed a wonderful relationship with the company as they strive to produce non-traditional theatre and art in non-traditional spaces.  The work they are producing is like no other and we want to support the company in a way that allows them to take risks in their creation and development process.”

– Elizabeth Dubben,  Executive Director of Collar Works

About Troy Foundry Theatre:

Troy Foundry Theatre is a professional not-for-profit theatre company based in Troy, NY co-founded by David Girard (Artistic Director), Emily Curro (Producing Executive Director), and Alexandra Tarantelli (Director of Finance Operations). They explore the social issues of today by collaborating with a variety of artists from multiple disciplines to produce and perform new work and reinterpreted classics through the means of new writing, devising and immersive performances.  They aim to produce live theatre and performance projects which will utilize extant writing, devised theatre, new media and/or original work. They strive to create theatre which is unique, thought-provoking and accessible to our community.

About Die-Cast:

Die-Cast was founded by Brenna Geffers and Thom Weaver. Rather than following a traditional subscription model, Die-Cast incubates work within spaces that are normally inaccessible to audiences. They look to fill those spaces with the work and have the work shaped by the space in turn. Die-Cast uses opera, movement, text, design, installation – whatever tools that best craft the experience for our audiences. They create full-length works as well as pop-up experiences for audiences to explore.  For more info visit www.die-castphilly.org.

About Collar Work:

Collar Works is a non-profit art space located at 621 River St. in Troy, NY dedicated to supporting emerging and underrepresented artists, working in any media, exhibiting challenging and culturally relevant contemporary artworks. Expanding the current art vernacular in New York’s Capital Region, Collar Works provides a venue for community dialogue focused on serious, provocative and spirited artworks. For more info visit http://collarworks.org.

About Elizabeth Murray:

Elizabeth Murray (b. 1940, Chicago; d. 2007, New York) belonged to a generation of artists who emerged in the 1970s and whose exposure to Cubist-derived Minimalism and Surrealist-influenced Pop inspired experimentation with new modes of expression that would bridge the gap between these two historical models. In this context, Murray produced a singularly innovative body of work. Warping, twisting, and knotting her constructed canvases, she has given the elastic shapes of classic surrealism a space in their own image.

Murray spent much of her childhood drawing. In 1958 she enter the School of the Art Institute of Chicago to become a commercial artist, but work by Paul Cézanne inspired her to pursue painting instead. After earning a BFA from the Institute in 1962 and an MFA from Mills College, Oakland in 1964, she moved to New York, where she developed her mature style.

Murray first exhibited at the Paula Cooper Gallery in 1974. Murray’s work has been the subject of nearly sixty solo exhibitions in galleries around the world since her New York City debut in the 1972 Annual Exhibition: Contemporary American Paintingat the Whitney Museum of American Art and has participated in six Whitney Biennial exhibitions since 1973. A comprehensive exhibition including over seventy-five

paintings and works on paper, from the earliest phase of Murray’s career in the 1960s through her most recent work was presented at the Museum of Modern Art in 2005 (only the fourth by a woman in the history of the Department of Painting and Sculpture a distinction previously given only to Louise Bourgeois, Lee Krasner and Helen Frankenthaler).

Murray received numerous awards for her work, including the Skowhegan Medal in Painting in 1986 and a MacArthur Foundation “genius” award in 1999. In addition to her teaching position at Bard College (Annandale-on-Hudson, NY), Murray held visiting faculty appointments at a number of American colleges and universities throughout her stellar career. Elizabeth Murray’s work can be found in over forty public collections in the United States.

For more information, please visit the Troy Foundry Theatre website at www.troyfoundrytheatre.com.

You can contact the Troy Foundry Theatre by emailing troyfoundrytheatre@gmail.com.

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